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Benefits of Exercise with Muscular Dystrophy

Learning to live with the diagnosis of  Muscular Dystrophy is a trying road. 

A horrible reality that affects hundreds of thousands of men and women, according to Medical News Today is, “Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of genetic diseases characterized by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal or voluntary muscles which control movement. The muscles of the heart and some other involuntary muscles are also affected in some forms of muscular dystrophy, and a few forms involve other organs as well.” Incredibly frightening, if you have been diagnosed with Muscular Dystrophy it is sometimes hard to know which way to turn to take control back of your life.

One place a person fighting this disease can turn to regain a connection with normalcy is to bring a regular exercise routine into their life. Why does exercise do a person with Muscular Dystrophy good? Here’s a look at five ways exercise helps considerably.

Exercise slows muscle deterioration. Having a regular strength routine using nautilus and free weights as well as cardio activities is highly beneficial. According to the National Center on Physical Activity and Disability just doing minimal movement with light weights or rubber resistance bands can help a person’s arms, legs and core considerably. This assistance with strength helps with maintaining a healthy posture, remaining independent, and maintaining a range of motion as well as keeping the joints flexible.

Exercise assists respiration. One of the greatest benefits of doing cardio exercise for people with Muscular Dystrophy is that it assists the diaphragm and other muscles associated with breathing to remain strong and agile. A common issue for those suffering from Muscular Dystrophy is a decrease in the functioning abilities of the diaphragm. Experts recommend low impact exercise like walking, yoga, biking, or swimming.

Exercise increases overall energy levels. As with all people, exercising helps the body remain healthy and have more energy overall. In regards to those people with Muscular Dystrophy, the March, 2005 issue of Neurology published a study that showed that people with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (a condition that affects the arm and face muscles) had less fatigue after having a regular workout plan for three months. Participants worked out on a bike for a little over a half hour five times a week.

Exercise helps boosts happiness. One issue for many people diagnosed with a disease is that they feel that their life has been limited to the illness, which results in depression. A highly beneficial way to counteract depression is to exercise. As little as ten minutes can turn a frown upside down.

 

Bio

Kishana Sainte writes on health and fitness topics on behalf of MyDocHub.com, a trusted online patient recommendation and medical information website. You can visit MyDocHub at www.mydochub.com

4 comments… add one

  • Oh my, I know what muscular dystrophy is, but I never really figured it would affect the heart as a muscle, too…
    It’s really sad to have such a disease affecting your every movement (literally in this case) and what’s even worse is the psychological restriction that comes along with it.
    Thank you for writing this article, I hope many people will find it inspiring and not let their shortcomings define them and limit their performance in daily life so easily.
    Hope you’re having a good day

  • MD is a disease that is often overlooked. More awareness is needed for this disease. Thank you for writing this article. And excellent point on the tip on gentle exercising. I believe that if you don’t use it, you will lose it. Same goes with muscle degeneration.

  • One of the greatest benefits of doing cardio exercise for people with Muscular Dystrophy is that it assists the diaphragm and other muscles associated with breathing to remain strong and agile.

  • According to the National Center on Physical Activity and Disability just doing minimal movement with light weights or rubber resistance bands can help a person’s arms, legs and core considerably.

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